Engineering Explained

Engineering Explained

Vor 29 Tage

Does The Italian Tune Up (Redlining Your Engine) Actually Work?
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Does a redline a day keep the mechanics away? The Italian Tune Up is often thought of as a solution for removing carbon from an engine, but does it really work? Looking into multiple research papers on the subject, I sought to answer three main questions: 1). What temperatures do carbon deposits form? 2). Can carbon deposits be removed from excessive heat? 3). Can engines get hot enough to remove carbon deposits?
An engine's redline is the highest speed it can safely operate. At this engine speed, you'll generally be at higher loads, and the stress and strain on the engine is high. Cylinder temperatures increase with the production of more power, and this heat can have effects on the engine internals. Is it enough to remove carbon deposits? Check out the video to find out!
Referenced Literature:
Direct Injection Intake Valve Deposits: www.sae.org/publications/technical-papers/content/2016-01-2252/
Piston Temperature Effects On Deposits: www.sae.org/publications/technical-papers/content/940948/
Intake Valve Temperatures: www.sae.org/publications/technical-papers/content/971729/
How Deposits Form In Engines: www.sae.org/publications/technical-papers/content/931032/
Measuring Piston Temperatures: www.sae.org/publications/technical-papers/content/2011-01-0407/
Suppressing Direct Injection Deposits: www.sae.org/publications/technical-papers/content/1999-01-3656/
Engine Conditions Deposit Formation: www.sae.org/publications/technical-papers/content/2015-01-1943/
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redlinecar engineitalian tune upcarbon depositsturbochargersuperchargerhorsepowertorquehigh revving enginefast carredline goodredline badis redlining badis redline baddoes the italian tune up workscienceengineering

KOMMENTARE
Engineering Explained
Engineering Explained Vor 29 Tage
Hope everyone's having a wonderful day! I made a video a while back about why engines lose power over time (summarized with 10 reasons), which feels relevant to this video, for anyone interested. Here's the link! a-head.net/id/video-uj8hjAjI7p4.html
Ride84XL
Ride84XL Vor 2 Tage
Really intresting! It didn't actually surpriced me that you can clean off deposits by heat. The question is mostly - how well will the engine do at the temperatures required. I use heat for cleaning grill grates all the time using my furnace, that I have built. I use to go higher in temperature though - about 500-600°C. At that point, carbon also starts to react with oxygen in the air forming carbon dioxide - wich makes it disapphear from the surface without any mechanical work (all that's left is ashes, that's very easy to remove). It's also not surpricing that 200°C is where it sticks at it's worst, because it's the same with grease on grill grates, pans and stove tops. After all, the deposits are carbon mixed with oil and fuel residue - most oils and fat probably have similar properties.
The Living Spirit
The Living Spirit Vor 5 Tage
I know that stretch of road your on. Can’t get fast enough to heat those pistons there. To many turns
Alaric Balthi
Alaric Balthi Vor 21 Tag
I had a carburetor "powered" car once that didn't get below the emission requirement, no matter what i tried. I was super pissed and decided to try revving the engine to either A) blow up or B) remove everything besides the aluminium and steel from the engine. As it was not injected and the ingnition didn't cut at any point, i revved the sh*t i out of it by driving couple of times up and down this steep and long hill nearby. Man, that engine cried! But it held together and i went immediately to get it tested and it passed with flying colours! That thing was tough! I had it couple of years before i had to let it go but for me, italian tuneup worked. Oh, the car? Peugeot 205. Have had two of those and i just love them.
Kevin Benfield
Kevin Benfield Vor 25 Tage
Engineering Explained is this why Honda designed vtec?
NickFury
NickFury Vor 28 Tage
+Meme Master i was referencing diesel pickups, which are a different animal. Generally in the cold the big diesel can coke up valves if left idling too long with no loads, they can even start to wash the cyls down with fuel. As far as diesel cars i have little experience.
Patrick Whitehead
Patrick Whitehead Vor 8 Stunden
Was the 240 wagon on the side of the road for sale?!
Ronald de Rooij
Ronald de Rooij Vor 10 Stunden
I don't know, but if I drive any car at high (legal) speeds for hours at an end like on vacation, it really seems to be a bit peppier afterwards. It does not last very long, though. I have no idea why. It might be just me, but the difference, although not dramatic, is noticeable. I noticed it in every car I ever owned. I would describe it as "reacting to the gas pedal input better".
András Szabó
András Szabó Vor 16 Stunden
It definitely works for me. but I don't drive fast. when the engine is warmed up already I used to speed up slowly in 3rd gear up to 5-6000 revolutions. I keep it there for some time and then I switch to higher gear. I do it this way because there is not extra fuel wasted, and does not put much wear on the engine neither. It works with all of our cars (carburetor and injection), and the engine runs much cleaner in general. When I took them to the emission test the technician didn't want to believe to his eyes, the carburetor engine did not produce CO until 5000 revs. Above that was 0.01%. :)
Tony Mouannes
Tony Mouannes Vor 18 Stunden
Driving uphill on a mountain highway with lots of curves do the trick (without having to worry about rpm or any technical stuff).
Nathan Van Pelt
Nathan Van Pelt Vor 18 Stunden
Carboculating is what i do to my weed before i eat it
Pete Zaitcev
Pete Zaitcev Vor 21 Stunde
This sort of thing is sometimes necessary in airplanes, although in that case there's no PCV and the carbon is mostly forming because of the mixture being too rich. I had a bit problem on IO-360 where plugs would foul with carbon (not lead). It was possible to get it out with a postcard, so it wasn't a solid carbon deposit. It would burn out on full power. Eventually, I swapped the plugs and that cured the problem (the initial formation was apparently because of ineffective ignition, so that combusting from the other plug was burning through the affected plug).
sasja de vries.
sasja de vries. Vor 21 Stunde
Well, engine load on modern cars is not really dependant on throttle position. Modern economy engines run hotter anyway. Leaner fuel makes it run hotter, during performance driving the A/F mixture is richer. One of the things that do help to reduce deposits is polishing and porting the intake, so that there are no spots for the carbon to hang onto. Correlating deposits to throttle position or RPMs for engines in general is just wrong, you can only do it for one engine with one setup and one tune. And some mechanics say that just taking an engine apart and leaving a carboned up part in the open air for a few weeks weakens the carbon layer, sometimes to a point where it can just fall of (in chunks) on it's own. I do know a method how to get your intake valves really hot, just let it run on gas and let it run lean. With gas I mean LPG or CNG, not that what you should be calling petrol or benzine. Gasses like LPG and CNG are more flexible in the A/F ratios it can run on, it can run on A/F ratios that a normal petrol engine would stall on. But if you do so, your engine and especially the valve do get hotter. And guess what: most of the reasons why people complain their LPG engine has a low lifespan, backfires or reduced engine compression are because of the intake valves getting too hot and because someone or something leaned out the A/F ratio. On a diesel engine you get less power when you lean it out, a petrol engine will get less stable, stall, etc (when you lean it out too much), but on LPG it will be running smoothly with just a bit less power (just like a diesel car). So you don't notice something is wrong, then your valves become hotter and after a while you will notice the problems. You simply shouldn't call gasoline "Gas", because it's not a gas, it's a liquid. Call it petrol, benzine, isooctane, benziños or at least gasoline. --- The bottom line is: you do never want to get your engine to be hot enough to break those deposits.
A Svit
A Svit Vor Tag
So what you’re saying is keep it at redline for a few hours
Qmentis
Qmentis Vor Tag
The Itialian tune was done whilst parked and no load to build up the heat... always used to sound bad to me.
Keyboard Dancers
Keyboard Dancers Vor Tag
drives iconic Italian marque in dispassionate fashion to deliver lecture on the Italian tune up...
Todd T
Todd T Vor 2 Tage
Here is a list of all the cars I have driven and never redlined:
DIOSpeedDemon
DIOSpeedDemon Vor 2 Tage
My car Red Lines at 17,000 Rpm. I take it there all the time. Not bad for a V-6. Not bad for a V-6 with 700 Brake Horse Power. Of Course my car is a Formula One Champion Race car and when I do happen to break it, the company gets some silly little mechanic to fix it for me- for free. So yes- Red Line is Good.....
Jerry Lifsey
Jerry Lifsey Vor 3 Tage
325 degrees C = 617! degrees F
Chaotic Chris
Chaotic Chris Vor 3 Tage
You've confirmed all the things racing teams have known/observed for years. You begin to explain it well at the 8:00 mark. At the end, I kinnnda disagree-ish....A better way to word it, would be, if your cars engine, has racing history behind it, and isn't just some commuter/putter engine, you can probably benefit from an Italian tune-up. Whether you should is another question. If you're car suffers from carbon build-up, bring your car to a certified mechanic to clean your engine how they see fit. Either way it's a great video. To further explain the racing engine history thing. Essentially, a lot of racing engines will need a few hours on the Dyno or track for "tune-up" and to "break the engine in". When doing this they often push the engine to its sustained limit, and dial in the ignition timing, compression, and boost (if any). After this they will rip the engine apart, do a full inspection to ensure parts are still in good/safe condition, and then put it back together. Often times this involves cleaning the intake valves (because those often gum up), and sometimes increasing piston size or springs. It is also common knowledge among race techs, that once this process is complete, the engine comes out with more power. NASCAR engines are usually 'spec engines' that come stock with 325HP (If I recall?) Either way every team gets the same HP engine and has to tune it to their liking from there. Often coming out with 350+HP. Rules do change over time, but the general Idea for any racing team, in any league, is to break-in the engine before throwing it at a long race. I guess this (driving your car hard to clean engine and increase power) is called the Italian tune-up partly because Ferrari claimed to get their mechanics to take customers cars around tracks. Ferrari was finding that most of their customers drove their cars slow and for short periods of time (i.e to car meets, the beech, or to dinner.) So carbon build up would choke the engines (engines designed for racing), and they would have to break it in to remove the carbon.....I'm not sure on the validity of these claims, since it might just be safer, cheaper, and less intensive to just have 1 to 3 mechanics strip the engine and clean it. Maybe they just told their customers this because it sounded cooler, and they probably would Dyno for a few mins after reassembly. Make sure it works. *shrug*
tonkatoytruck
tonkatoytruck Vor 3 Tage
Hitting red line just to hit red line is not wise. To get the most out of your motor, put it on a dyno. That way you know where max power is made and that becomes your target rpm. Many may find that peak power is NOT at peak RPM. Second, changing your O2 sensors every 40 to 50K miles would be far better. Vacuum leaks cause rich conditions that also lead to carbon build up.
DCassidy42
DCassidy42 Vor 3 Tage
7:43 If you want to get straight to the point.
RavenPrecept
RavenPrecept Vor 4 Tage
When I was a teenager I would occasionally drive my granny's car. This Mini would be very choked up and not rev very high when I first got in it but by the time I had come back from a 200 mile trip at 90mph it would be very responsive.
Eric Van Buggenhaut
Eric Van Buggenhaut Vor 4 Tage
OTOH, is it really safe to record such a video while driving and focusing more on what you're telling than on the road ?
Todor
Todor Vor 5 Tage
After redline is a blackline. This is even better for car than redline xd
Alvin Jiang
Alvin Jiang Vor 5 Tage
My guess is that it's a dynamic process.Redlining the engine would raise up the temp but in the same time kinda worsen the working condition(less time for air intake and fuel to diffuse and mix, less time for combustion, harder control for reaching best ignition timing), so on one hand the carbon is etching away since high temp, on the other hand,much more carbon is forming.But this is all guessing, to find where the equivalent point is would need some experiments.
Svend Tveskæg
Svend Tveskæg Vor 6 Tage
It may not be possible to excactly CLEAN an engine, that has been driven by an elderly person who was scared by revs, but it definitely is a way to KEEP the engine clean, if it was clean from the beginning. Take it out on the freeway for an occasional blast. And don´t feel sorry for it, keep the revs up there for a good while. Not redline, about 2/3 to 3/4 load. You´l notice the difference the next morning, especially if you normally does a lot of city traffic.
TheDownloader86
TheDownloader86 Vor 6 Tage
I dont have direct injection engine. Is still it in production any engine with indirect injection? :).
Sean O'Neill
Sean O'Neill Vor 6 Tage
I like to put diesel in my gas car and yell incoherently until I stall on the highway. It does not clean my engine.
Dan T.
Dan T. Vor 7 Tage
isnt burning carbon deposits just a longer way to say regeneration ?
System Error Message
System Error Message Vor 7 Tage
i find that there are 2 things that help to keep the engine clean, driving very fast but not redlining, and engine braking at a high RPM. At high speeds theres lots more air so less carbons end up alone as you have more air, as with engine braking, sometimes vacuum can help the carbon deposits and dirt come out. I did this with a car that was never stressed for 4 years and the next oil change was black but it now works very well. Dont engine brake till you redline though and if you're using a manual transmission, make sure you know the velocity limits of each gear.
Kurk
Kurk Vor 8 Tage
You don't understand chemistry much at all yet you claim to be a mechanical engineer?? Must have gone to a non ABET accredit school.
Jarno vm
Jarno vm Vor 8 Tage
Thnx! Very interesting vid!
Taxi Rob
Taxi Rob Vor 9 Tage
if you manage to ignite carbon deposits, you'll end up burning a hole in your piston.
David Mccarron
David Mccarron Vor 9 Tage
nice tray but its drive it like you stole it ...... only slow driving alows the egr to open and gum up the back off the inlet valves hi reves stop it opening get rid off all egr s thy kill cars
Kyntteri
Kyntteri Vor 9 Tage
"Is redline good"? That is like asking if binge drinking is good.
Johann Kuhn
Johann Kuhn Vor 11 Tage
Interesting video. My carbed '87 Mazda 323 definitely benefits. If I put the wrong petrol in it (not Caltex), the engine gets extremely lazy in just one tank. But then after driving close to 200km highway, with a few near redline pulls (passing), it feels like a brand new car (actually the power is then better than new).
Rotor Thermotech
Rotor Thermotech Vor 11 Tage
Hmmmmm, how about the valves you talked about recently that were internally cooled, maybe not so good for carbon buildup ?
Bobby Murray
Bobby Murray Vor 11 Tage
Could this be something that originated with older vehicles? I remember my grandfather, who was a mechanic, saying he used to push his cars hard to "blow off carbon." At his age, I'm pretty sure he was dealing with carburated engines back in the 60's & 70's that did not have Fuel Injection.
bluwng
bluwng Vor 11 Tage
Is that car borrowed. I'm an aerospace engineer and I can't afford that car.
ed ha
ed ha Vor 12 Tage
My money's on this cure being worse than the disease. The engine's designers surely figger on a little carbon in there.
Roland Chevrier
Roland Chevrier Vor 13 Tage
The reason you came here 8:52
S1000RR Ant
S1000RR Ant Vor 13 Tage
Hard break in vs soft
Timothy Stewart
Timothy Stewart Vor 14 Tage
What about the mechanical hammering an intake valve would go through at redline? It would seem to my feeble mind that it would help break deposits up.
Mike Kay
Mike Kay Vor 14 Tage
I think the term "Italian tune up" is referring to older cars that are carbureted, not modern day injected cars.
broncokonco
broncokonco Vor 14 Tage
I don't think engine/component temps are the only thing contributing to the "tune up" effect. Higher velocity fluid flow should have an effect as well.
Alessandro Guarda
Alessandro Guarda Vor 16 Tage
Uhm, I'm from Milan (Italy), I work on engines in my spare time since when I was 15 (now I'm 43), and this is the very first time I hear about the "Italian tune up"... Is this american slang or what?
Alessandro Guarda
Alessandro Guarda Vor 16 Tage
+Engineering Explained thanks mate. I can only think that it originated there because Italian's performance engines are generally quite high revving. You're doing a good job with these videos and the studies you do behind the scenes. Good luck from Italy. PS: what about some video on 180+hp / 13500rpm 4 cylinders motorcycle engines? :)
Engineering Explained
Engineering Explained Vor 16 Tage
According to Road & Track (or maybe it was C&D), it originated in Italy. But I mean there are lots of things that have originated in America that I have no idea about haha
Erik Axzell
Erik Axzell Vor 16 Tage
Great video. Thanks
Stephen McCoy
Stephen McCoy Vor 17 Tage
Spraying a mist of water into your air intake can remove deposits as well as completely destroying your engine if you're not careful. I would love to see a video of this, I believe it was used by the airforce of old as a means of decoking their engines.
Krbulja stil
Krbulja stil Vor 17 Tage
Our experience, yes, it is "good" for the car, as far as the removing of carbon composites goes (tons of other reasons why not to do it, but we still do it). As far as the removing of carbon, yeah, works, we took a look at intake manifold when car was bought, filled with EGR gunk... 2 years of regular redlining, almost clean as brand new... sure it is an italian car, so maybe it prefers the italian tune up :D
Dean MacCrone
Dean MacCrone Vor 17 Tage
If you drive your car gently in the city AND before it reaches operating temperature AND do at least 2 hours of highway a week your engine will last a long time, as mine do. Change that oil every 5000km though, whether regular or synthetic.
GazMk2 RC
GazMk2 RC Vor 17 Tage
I’ve always been a great believer that winding the engine out now and then does it good. Not all day every day mind! Lol. But certainly once in a journey.
Shorne Pubique
Shorne Pubique Vor 17 Tage
they should nickel plate valves. nickle is slippery - I like slippery nickles.
Shorne Pubique
Shorne Pubique Vor 17 Tage
the runout on that crankshaft lol
Shorne Pubique
Shorne Pubique Vor 17 Tage
it's not a two stroke engine
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